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Episode 2: Income Planning in Retirement part II

Joshua Klooz 0:00
Welcome to the wisdom and wealth podcast. I'm your host, Josh Klooz. Each week, I'll be leading a series of conversations
with our team here at Carson wealth, which are designed to equip our listeners with the
helpful insights necessary to simplify the critical decision points of life. We believe that true wealth is the thing Money
cannot buy, and death cannot take away. Furthermore, we also believe our calling is
to enable others to fulfill their own. And to that end, we end up Welcome to part two of my discussion with
Sarah Dewey, from our Trust Services team and Scott Schlossman. From our accounting team, today's discussion
focuses on keeping in mind your income tax bracket at retirement RMD, age of 72, and
the tax brackets of your heirs who will be absorbing your qualified accounts over a 10
year period that is often in their peak earning years. Welcome back in what I've experienced from
my side has been, you know, clients typically when I when I when I put hard math behind
it and say, Hey, this is this is obviously tax laws can change your state laws can change
and investment returns vary, but would you be okay with this amount of money going to
the IRS and this amount of money going to your kids and basically bucketing that and
saying, Okay, if we make these minor tweaks, it changes your not only your marginal tax
bracket, but your average payment 1%, you know, over the lifetime, or just basically
moves move the needle? Does that make you feel what does that make
you think, you know, would you would you follow that? And typically, that's that's far more compelling.

But I guess, you know, maybe that's just because
I'm a numbers guy. So I don't want to bore anybody with you raised
the question of beginning with the end in mind, and I think a lot of planning is done
with, you know, with that not in mind, to put it charitably, right? And so I don't I don't know how else to given
the this changes with the secure. I don't know how else to the handle that then
to begin with that.

And just say, hey, you know, we know for a
fact that things change. But given given your trajectory in life, this
is what could happen. I'd be curious for both of you all's feedback
to me. When should I be having that conversation
from a wealth planning perspective with a client, as far as they've done a great job
saving? But when should we take a little bit off the
table from a qualified perspective? And you know, because the traditional thought
process was the for everything you possibly can into a qualified account, from your perspectives,
what should I be keeping in mind? And starting to diversify that outcome, whether
it's, you know, trying to get them to do Roth roles, whether it's trying to get them just
to save more in taxable accounts for CAP gains perspective? What have you, have you seen success? And a good a good process there? Is it just a constant dialogue between us? And Scott, go ahead, jump in on on this, if
you don't mind? Scott Schlaufman 3:24
Yeah, I mean, you know, it's one of these where the more I learned about it, the more
I think, you know, I feel like, it's always tricky, because, like, I'm in my 30s.

And, you know, I can look back to when I was
in my 20s, and be like, Man, I wish I had done certain things from a, from a, you know,
from a wealth management standpoint, because when I was in my 20s, when you're in your
20s, you wanted to spend everything you have, and, you know, you don't think about that
retirement element, or what vehicles you're using, whether you're thinking about contributing
to a Roth, whatever. And so, you know, I guess my my answer is
almost Well, you know, to me, it seems smart to start thinking about it early, start thinking
about, you know, how am I going to see this money actually come out of these accounts? Because with I feel like, when I was talking
to a couple of people around here yesterday, and with when we're contributing to IRAs,
especially, we think of it as well, it's coming out on my paycheck, and it's not going to
be you know, that portion of my paycheck that I put into the IRA isn't going to be taxed.

And really, that's almost misleading in a
way because when we think about RMDs, what this really is about is kind of the pendulum
swinging the other way, if you will, where the RMD is, when like, fundamentally when
you put your money into an IRA account, what it does in that IRA accounts is it says Is
there and it gains value. So you start putting in money at 30, or whatever
it may be, that money is going to gain value, whether it's through capital gains, dividends,
interest, it's going to sit there and gain money until you pull it out. And throughout that whole process, as it's
gaining money, you aren't being taxed on that interest, you aren't being taxed on the initial
contribution. And so really, what this kind of comes down
to is the when you're pulling, the IRS eventually wants you to pull that money out, because
you haven't been taxed on it for a lot of years.

And so really, this RMD, it comes down to
listen, you have all this money sitting in these Ira vehicles, we want you to take it
out, we want you to take it out. So we can tax it. So you can maybe have a little bit of fun
with it. And so going back to the original question,
the sooner you can think about Okay, listen, this is going to be taxed at some point.

What can I do with it? How can I, even if even if it's going to be
taxed? It's almost How can I control that? Joshua Klooz 6:03
Yeah, and it significantly limits, the more you have in that qualified account, it significantly
limits your ability to gift in certain ways based off of the tax restraints, Sara what
what would what would you say, with regard to kind of the the balance of taxable versus
maybe even Roth versus qualified? From your perspective, what have you seen
given the changes that have been made? And I think part of the issue is that, since
the law just changed. We're we're moving everything into hypotheticals. Currently, there haven't been a lot of people
that have, you know, that have basically been burned by this scenario just yet.

But I think stories are going to come out
more and more, as far as like, Man, if I would have known that this tax law change would
have changed, I would have, I would have structured my wealth a lot differently as I was earning
it and saving it. Sarah Duey 7:04
Well, I think overall, Americans have so much and qualified plans, and it's usually, quite
commonly I don't have an exact statistic, but it's commonly the single largest asset
in somebody's portfolio. Just to think about, okay, what can we do
with that? And now that the secure Act is passed, no
longer are we deferring it and you know, oh, well, we can just stretch it for our children,
that's no longer available in most instances. So it's really about management is the smoothing
out of the income. And that's where the two of you come in from
the, you know, professional angle of your your expertise, how can we smooth out this
income tax liability going forward, given the fact that, you know, we have this huge
asset from which we are required to take you know, income from and it will be includable,
on our tax return.

So, you know, getting in advance of that,
and thinking about alternatives. You know, whether the rust continues to make
sense, whether it even makes is available to you, if you're a certain earning stage
of your life. So, as Scott was alluding to earlier, the
sooner the better, I think that you can start thinking about it. And working with a professional to help you
plan all that is makes a ton of sense. Yeah, Joshua Klooz 8:26
absolutely. And again, I go back to there's probably not
a right or wrong answer. For everyone, right. However, I, I believe my calling is to enable
others to fulfill their own and I want them to derive as much joy and happiness as they
possibly can from the time that they've exchanged for their wealth.

And so I am yet to run into the client, though,
that that doesn't believe that they can allocate their earnings better than the IRS can write. I just have it maybe maybe I will find someone
someday. But I, you know, I don't think I'm going to. With that in mind, I think it's also important
that clients realize that their heirs will have 10 years to distribute these funds after
they have passed. So you can imagine the scenario in which your
heirs are in their peak earning years and have to absorb all this other income at regular
income tax rates. So from a tangible perspective, what would
an additional 100 or $200,000, do for your heirs income tax brackets in those 10 years
that they're absorbing these resources? How much would they be paying in regular income
tax? This is definitely something that you need
to keep in mind and plan for.

The next piece that I would look at too, from
a from a Roth four on K perspectives, and it's got I'm curious for your perspective,
your traditional model is been, you know, early early in your career contribute to the
Roth 401. K, you know, because it just became available
not long ago, but you know, given that contribute to that. And then once your income gets into those
higher brackets, then you toggle over to a traditional 401k. More and more, I'm curious, if there comes
a point at which, you know, you're, you're better off just just moving back, depending
on, you know, obviously, your arbitraging tax tax brackets, but are you experiencing
clients asking you prior to retirement? Are they asking you those questions? Scott Schlaufman 10:49
You know, so far, honestly, we haven't seen a lot of it.

But I think, you know, especially, you know,
as the laws continue to change, I mean, we've talked a lot about the secure act, and even
now, more and more RMDs. You know, the RMD age may continue to go up
there is legislation. So, you know, I think, you know, it's tricky,
because with so many laws, it's, you know, it can so many potential laws, I guess I shouldn't
say, you know, there's always that possibility of change. It's hard, feels like it's harder and harder
to kind of, you know, come up with a strategy that's going to be valid for you know, 510
years down the road, but yeah, yeah, exactly. When we have them personally. We're trying and that's, you know, I think,
you know, so many so many situations, it's hard to, it's hard to really come up with
one good umbrella for everyone because, but that's why we're all working together.

That's the great thing about you know, Carson,
having all these services now is we can really tailor everything we need. Joshua Klooz 11:58
Well, that is all for today. We appreciate your time and trust that you
are better equipped to steward both your wealth and your financial resources. If you have questions or suggestions for a
future topic, please direct those to info Houston at Carson wealth.com Thank you again
for joining us today. May you and your family encounter truth, beauty
and goodness in the room and The opinions voiced in the wisdom wealth podcast that advisor
and host are for general information purposes only, and are not intended to provide specific
advice or recommendations for any individual.

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The 4 phases of retirement | Dr. Riley Moynes | TEDxSurrey

Transcriber: Zsófia Herczeg
Reviewer: Peter Van de Ven Everyone says you have to get ready
to retire financially. And of course you do. But what they don’t tell you
is that you also have to get ready psychologically. Who knew? But it’s important
for a couple of reasons. First, 10,000 North Americans
will retire today and every day for the next 10 to 15 years. This is a retirement tsunami. And when these folks come
crashing onto the beach, a lot of them are going to feel
like fish out of water without a clue as to what to expect. Secondly, it’s important
because there is a very good chance that you will live one third
of your life in retirement. So it’s important that you have
a heads up to the fact that there will be significant
psychological changes and challenges that come with it.

I belong to a walking group
that meets early three mornings a week. Our primary goal is to put
10,000 steps on our Fitbits, and then we go for coffee
and cinnamon buns – (Laughter) more important. (Laughter) (Applause) So as we walk, we’ve gotten into the habit
of choosing a topic for discussion. And one day, the topic was, “How do you squeeze
all that juice out of retirement?” How's that for 7:00 in the morning? So we walk and we talk, and the next day,
we go on to the next topic. But the question stayed with me because I was really having
some challenges with retirement. I was busy enough,
but I really didn’t feel that I was doing very much
that was significant or important. I was really struggling.

I thought I had a pretty good idea of what success looked like
in a working career, but when it came to retirement,
it was fuzzier for me. So I decided to dig deeper. And what I discovered was
that much of the material on retirement focuses on the financial
and/or the estate side of things. And of course, they’re both important
but just not what I was looking for. So I interviewed dozens
and dozens of retirees, and I asked them the question, “How do you squeeze
all the juice out of retirement?” What I discovered
was that there is a framework that can help make sense of it all.

And that’s what I want
to share with you today. You see, there are four distinct phases that most of us move through
in retirement. And as you’ll see,
it’s not always a smooth ride. In the next few minutes, you’ll recognize
which phase you’re in if you’re retired, and if you’re not, you’ll have a better idea
of what to expect when that time comes. And best of all, you’ll know
that there is a phase four – the most gratifying,
satisfying of the four phases – and that’s where you can squeeze
all the juice out of retirement. Phase one is the vacation phase,
and that’s just what it’s like. You wake up when you want,
you do what you want all day. And the best part
is that there is no set routine. For most people, phase one represents
their view of an ideal retirement. Relaxing, fun in the sun – freedom, baby. (Laughter) And for most folks, phase one
lasts for about a year or so, and then, strangely,
it begins to lose its luster.

We begin to feel a bit bored. We actually miss our routine. Something in us seems to need one. And we ask ourselves, “Is that all there is to retirement?” Now when these thoughts and feelings
start to bubble up, you have already moved into phase two. Phase two is when we feel loss, and we feel lost. Phase two is when we lose the big five – significant losses
all associated with retirement. We lose that routine. We lose a sense of identity. We lose many of the relationships
that we had established at work. We lose a sense of purpose. And for some people,
there is a loss of power. Now, we don’t see these things coming. We didn't see these losses coming in
because they happened all at once. It’s like, poof, gone. It’s traumatic. Phase two is also when we come
face to face with the three Ds: divorce, depression and decline – both physical and mental. The result of all of this is that we can feel
like we’ve been hit by a bus.

You see, before we can
appreciate and enjoy some of the positive aspects
associated with phase three and four, you are going to, in phase two, feel fear, anxiety
and quite even depression. That’s just the way it is. So buckle up and get ready. Fortunately, at some point,
most of us say to ourselves, “Hey, I can’t go on like this. I don’t want to spend the rest of my life, perhaps 30 years, feeling like this.” And when we do, we’ve turned the corner to phase three. Phase three is a time of trial and error. In phase three, we ask ourselves, “How can I make my life meaningful again? How can I contribute?” The answer often is to do things
that you love to do and do really well. But phase three can also deliver
some disappointment and failure. For example, I spent a couple of years
serving on a condo board until I finally got tired
of being yelled at. (Laughter) You see, one year the board decided
that we were going to plant daffodils rather than the traditional daisies. (Laughter) And we got yelled at. Go figure.

I thought about law school,
thinking perhaps of becoming a paralegal. And then I completed a program
on dispute resolution. It all went nowhere. I love to write. So I created a program
called “Getting started on your memoirs.” That program has met
with “limited success.” (Laughter) It’s been a rocky road for me too,
and I told you to buckle up. Now, I know all this can sound bad.

But it’s really important to keep trying and experimenting
with different activities that’ll make you want
to get up in the morning again because if you don’t, there’s a real good chance
of slipping back into phase two, feeling like you’ve been hit by a bus. And that is not a happy prospect. Not everyone breaks through to phase four, but those who do
are some of the happiest people I have ever met. Phase four is a time
to reinvent and rewire. But phase four involves
answering some tough questions too, like, “What’s the purpose here?
What’s my mission? How can I squeeze
all the juice out of retirement?” You see, it’s important that we find
activities that are meaningful to us and that give us a sense
of accomplishment. And my experience is that it almost always
involves service to others. Maybe it’s helping a charity
that you care about. Maybe you’ll be like the old coots.

(Laughter) (Applause) Yeah. These folks took a booth
in the local farmers market and were prepared to give their advice
based on their vast years of experience to anyone who came by. So one of their first visitors was a kid
who wanted help with his math homework (Laughter) on his tablet. (Laughter) They did the best they could. Or maybe you’ll be like my friend Bill. I met Bill a few years ago
in a 55 plus activity group. In the summer, we golf together
and walk together and bicycle together. And in the winter, we curl. But Bill had this idea that we should exercise
our brains as well. He believed that there was
a tremendous pool of expertise and experience in our group, and so he approached a number of folks and asked if they would volunteer to teach some of the things
that they love to do to others. And almost invariably, they agreed. Bill himself taught two sessions, one on iPads and one on iPhones, because we were smart enough to know
that a number of our members had been given these things
as gifts at Christmas (Laughter) by their children, and that they barely knew
how to turn them on.

The first year, we offered nine programs,
and there were 200 folks signed up. The next year, that number
expanded to 45 programs with over 700 folks participating. And the following year,
we offered over 90 programs and had 2100 registrations. Amazing. (Applause) That was Bill. Our members taught us
to play bridge and mahjong. They taught us to paint. They taught us to repair our bicycles. We tutored and mentored local school kids. We set up English-as-a-second-language
programs for newcomers. We had book clubs. We had film clubs. We even had a few golf clubs. Exhausting but exhilarating.

That’s what’s possible in phase four. And do you remember the five losses
that we talked about in phase two? The loss of our routine and identity and relationships and purpose and power? In phase four, these are all recovered. It is magic to see, magic. So, I urge you to enjoy
your vacation in phase one. (Laughter) Be prepared for the losses in phase two. Experiment and try as many different
things as you can in phase three, and squeeze all the juice
out of retirement in phase four. (Applause).

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Early Retirement in Singapore.. How Does This Singaporean Couple Spend Their Days?

Hey everyone, we are back in Singapore! We love 
Singapore so we spend our time in Penang and   also in Singapore as we are so blessed 
to call both places our home. So how does   retirement look like in Singapore? I bet you 
what comes to mind at first is probably old people in a kopitiam drinking coffee, gossiping with 
their friends or they are just staying home   because Singapore is just so expensive 
right? You don't want to spend a lot of   money, especially when you're retired.

So in this 
video, allow us to take you to a journey on how   our life in Singapore looks like as an early 
retired couple. If you're new to our Channel   I'm Fran, one half of the Corporate Breakout 
Couple. Please Like this video and Subscribe   to our Channel so that you don't miss any of 
it and to our followers, welcome back!! [Music] Welcome to Toast Box! I do this every 
single morning ever since I got retired.   Just kidding! This is a traditional Singapore 
breakfast and we love having a breakfast like   this every time we're in Singapore. Singapore 
is a very hustle and bustle city so therefore   we like to slow things down and have a long 
leisurely breakfast at Toast Box and there's   hardly anyone around because they're all at 
work.

You know, the teh (tea) in Toast Box is really   good! Very fragrant and milky so we like 
to pair it with kaya toast and eggs. [Music]   Welcome to East Coast Park, one of our favorite 
haunts in Singapore. Fran and I spent a lot of   time, especially in 2021 during the lockdown, 
to come here and be connected to nature,   to go for long walks so that we can center 
ourselves and also get some exercise as well.   And because we are in a very peaceful environment, 
sometimes this is where we get our best business   ideas and our best investment ideas and also more 
than more often than not, Fran and I have great   conversations over here. This is one of my favorite 
spots to breathe in the fresh sea air and practice   my breathing exercises. These breathing exercises 
helps me to center myself and helps me to focus on   the day ahead. These walks by East Coast really 
benefited us in many ways from the fresh air   to the sun to getting exercise and it really 
helps to kick start the rest of the day.

[Music] Back when I was working in Singapore, I never 
ever took the bus because I was afraid I'll   miss my stop and waste time. Now I love taking the 
bus as I get to see the sights around Singapore. As   for me, I used to drive all the time. I have never 
really taken public transport for the longest time.   That was because I was always in a rush. Now I get 
to travel leisurely at my own time, at my own pace. Oh this is my favorite fish soup in the whole 
world. Really I'm not joking. It is so so good   and it's located at my workplace back in the past 
and each time we're in Singapore nowadays, I will   definitely drag John to eat a delicious bowl of 
goodness here. The place is so tiny therefore, it's   always impossible to get a seat, therefore we 
always come early. Yay!! We're heading to Duxton Hill for dinner and guess what? Behind me is 
Chinatown where our Hawker Stall used to be. We do come here pretty often because the food is 
really good.

So this is the place when we wanna eat really   nice Japanese food. There's a reason why we are 
here regularly at Mitsu Bar. Not only do they serve   up great quality Japanese food, they also offer 
fantastic promotional discounts which we'll share   with you later. We love this place because the 
seafood is always so fresh, the aburi sushi is   so tasty and the wagyu beef melts in your mouth. 
And the omakase sets are really worth it as well.   How much do you think a Japanese dinner like 
this will cost? Normally an eight-dish dinner   will cost around SGD200 for a setting like this. 
But for tonight's dinner, this is how much it costs SGD94.45. That's half the price. Why 
would you want to pay full price   for something, when you can get a 
great discount for the exact same   item? The deals are out there for you to 
grab it, just like opportunities in life.

Welcome to Haji Lane! John and I, we 
like to spend our weekdays here sometimes because   there's lots to do. My favorite bar is just 
down the street. There's lots of food, quaint little   shops, little shopping sprees to be had all around 
this Lane and you can literally spend hours here.   I've been coming to Haji Lane 
for years and of course, now I drag   John along with me as all my friends are 
unfortunately working during the weekdays.   Over the years, Haji Lane has blossomed into a 
myriad of quaint little shops and eateries. One   could really get lost for hours browsing through 
all the offerings. If you get thirsty or hungry, no   fear! There's lots of great eateries and watering 
holes to be found.

In the past, my friends and I   could spend hour,s all the way from lunch all 
the way till after dinner at Haji Lane alone.   Malls are a great way to escape the heat. You know, 
Singapore has so many malls. We literally can   spend a day in a different mall for a week, oh no, 
actually a month! So what do we usually do in the   malls on a weekday? Well the malls are huge so 
we usually clock more than 10,000 steps walking   around the malls, then there's shopping. You've got 
eating snacks, watching movies, playing pool.

The   list is endless. It's always good to get out of the 
house to see the latest developments of Singapore.   Singapore moves very fast so there's always 
something new. If you don't get out, how we know?   Because Fran and I travel so often, the money 
changers at Raffles Place are our best friends.   And I love comparing all the different rates at
the money changers for the best Forex deals. [Music]   Spending time with my parents, my siblings and their family in Singapore is a must. I really treasure this time with my parents in the   past. I used to spend only weekend dinners with 
them and that too, was rushed. Eat and go. But now I can   really have quality conversations with them with 
no rush in Singapore. Both John and I each have our   different sets of friends that we love to hang 
out with. I really love this group of friends as   they were the first friends I made when I first 
came to Singapore.

Getting to spend the day with   them is such a joy and it really warms my heart 
to have a friendship like this. While I was out   with my friends, John was having bro time over 
drinks. And of course, we also have mutual sets   of friends which we love to hang out with and have 
fun with, especially at dinner parties. As a couple,   we feel that it is always healthy to have separate 
group of friends and mutual ones as well. These   friendships are important to us.

As we grow older 
we treasure these relationships even more. [Music] [Music].

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Things We Wished We Knew Before Retirement

Well it's great to be with you all again it's 
another video day for us – It is – So things that   we wish we knew before we retired almost 
sounds like a country music song there Tina   – And I guess you must be feeling lucky 
today Norm – Oh yeah got my lucky shirt   on so because we're filming been to 
Costco – Got the great deals haven't we   – We have so one of the things that we wish we knew 
before we retired was how free it is how stress   free no longer having to get up and go through the 
morning ritual of preparing yourself to go to work   and being accountable to somebody else all 
day long it's wonderful to be accountable to   your own self and your partner that's it 
you're your own person and it's such a freeing   feeling and we saw that with Tina when she gave 
up work the amount of stress we hadn't realized   until a few years after retirement just how 
different she was she'd lost all that stress of   meeting quotas and all that good stuff – And I think 
I'll just add Norm that when you're actually doing   the job you actually don't think it is stressful 
you don't think you are under all this   stress until you stop it do something else and 
you think wow this is a lot better we like this   it's great so just being accountable to ourselves 
we love it don't we – It is totally life changing   – One thing that we do think is very important 
before you retire is you do need to have a   discussion with your partner as to what it is 
that the ideas that you're both thinking you   have when you're going to retire you do need to 
have some goals about, do you want to travel do   you want to garden or do hobbies do you want 
to stay home you really do need to have that   conversation to make sure you're both on the 
same page – I think it is it is important and   we hear a lot from some comments especially 
married women who are saying that their husband   their frightened the husband will get under their feet 
because he'll be hanging around all the time in   retirement but that really isn't the case – Not 
for us is it – We've been secure as a couple for   the longest time and retirement hasn't changed 
how we feel about each other and about what   our expectations of each other is it's not as if 
we've all of a sudden being locked up together in   retirement (no) so it is important to figure out 
what you both want out of retirement and to have   that discussion a few years before you actually 
do retire (yeah) one thing to bear in mind is   the first few years of your retirement you'll 
be your most healthy so just use that health and   strength that you do have in the early years 
to achieve some of the goals that you want   – Yeah and if you want to be traveling do it while 
you've got that – Don't think about traveling if   that's on your list just do it right away – Yeah 
absolutely and that's what we've done isn't   it when we retired we just traveled everywhere 
didn't we it was great – About two years before we   retired we had an inspector come to the house 
for I don't even remember what it was but it was   some form of home inspection that we had to and 
so we got chatting with him because he was a few   years older than us but not that much and he told 
us that he had a house very similar to ours that   he had sold and now he was living an apartment 
and he went through the whole process of them   and how they moved to the apartment and how 
it was such an improvement on their life   and it was something we'd never ever considered 
– This was big news to us wasn't it we never even   thought about renting an apartment – We had been 
homeowners since we were 19 years old so to rent   we had that preconceived idea that it was throwing 
money away but the more that we looked into it so   after he left the next couple of days we spent 
many hours thinking about this we did a budget   of how much it cost to keep our mortgage free 
home – Yeah crunched all the numbers – And what the   rent would be and if we had sold the house and it 
made more and more sense to us to sell the house   to downsize into an apartment bank the money 
from the house live off that as an investment and   that's what we did – And that's what we did didn't 
we – But had that guy not come to our house we might   never have come up with that idea – No because 
originally we had thought that we would just   buy a smaller house didn't we – That's right yeah 
– So part of our decision when we had actually now   decided that we were going to rent and we realized 
that would take care of we wouldn't have all this   maintenance and stuff like that to do we decided 
after we started looking at apartments that if   we moved to a cheaper area could we benefit by 
getting the same as what we wanted in an apartment   but would it cost us less money so the more 
we looked into it we did have a family member   who lived in a cheaper place so we looked 
at the equivalent of renting an apartment   in this new place and it was so much cheaper 
wasn't it Norm – Because we initially thought   we would just sell our house and stay in 
the same area so we started shopping for   apartments to find out how much they cost and the 
availability and we were pretty surprised that   at the expense of them but we were prepared 
to pay that (yeah) and then we came to a what   you would call it a small town that's cheaper 
(yeah) we came to visit a family member here and so   we started looking around at the apartments here 
and they were substantially cheaper about $800   a month cheaper than where we were initially going 
to – Yeah and not only that Norm there was a lot of   extras with it wasn't that we got there was 
underground parking and what else a swimming pool   – And laundry facilities in the apartment – And that 
was one thing the gentleman had told us he didn't   have on-suite laundry he had it in a laundry room 
so we wanted that – But coming to the cheaper town   it wasn't just the rents that were 
cheaper everything was cheaper   the Tina's hairdresser as we've 
said in the past was cheaper it just permeated everything so our budget became 
so attainable (yeah) by moving – That gave us a lot   more money to be able to travel didn't it because 
we thought if we can save money on a daily basis   and it worked perfect didn't it – It did it was 
great, take a look at that if you do have family   that live in an area that might be cheaper or 
just consider going not knowing anybody – No it's   like a new adventure isn't it a new chapter in 
your life because we've made friends here and   they don't have any family just here but they've 
made it a new place for them haven't they – A lot   of people have moved out of the big cities to a 
small town because it's it's far more conducive to   retirement (yes) and friendlier another 
thing that you really need to consider   is where your friends are going to come from 
in retirement because once you leave work   those friendships tend to wither away because 
the only common bond you have was your job   your workplace so we've never 
really had lasting friendships from   work colleagues they've always been outside 
of there so it's it's critically important   to continue looking for friendships in retirement 
and being outgoing and prepared to speak to people   Tina when we moved to this apartment building 
they did have a social room and they did a coffee   morning and so she would go down there and we 
found out so much information about the town and   businesses to use – It was great wasn't it – It was – It 
was kind of my mission wasn't it to find out   new information and to try and make new friends 
which we did and we made some fabulous friendships   – Well in particular there was one couple that Tina 
made struck up a friendship with and they in turn   have introduced us to another couple yeah and then 
they in turn have introduced us to another couple   so that's how it goes – Yeah so now we've got 
a group of really close nice friends that we   socialize with don't we – And the thing that we have 
in common isn't an employer it's being retired   – It is isn't it – It really is so don't be afraid 
of striking out to a new city a new town   because it's relatively easy to make friendships 
– Yeah you just have to push yourself out there   a little don't you and be confident to going to 
things and it's very exciting isn't it so we hope   that everybody is staying safe – And keeping 
well – Until the next time bye bye, bye bye

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Gold Roth IRA | Gold Roth IRA Rollover | Gold Investing In IRA’s | IRA Transfer

Gold Roth IRA https://www.regalassets.com/a/1237/ You have been following the markets for quite
some time. You're thinking about retirement planning,
but at the same time wondering what investment is best for protecting your future. After doing some research you decide to go
with a physical precious metals investment by executing a 401K rollover into a gold IRA. Now you must decide which precious metals
are right for your gold IRA portfolio and determine whether or not they are permitted. A Gold IRA can also be referred to as a Self
Directed IRA, Gold 401K, and a Roth IRA. Prior to 1997, rules and regulations permitted
only American Gold and Silver Eagles to be placed within a Gold IRA. However, the passage of the Tax Payer Relief
Act of 1997 made it possible to diversify a gold 401k amongst many different precious
metals. Current regulations now permit the placement
of gold bullion coins and bars, silver bullion coins and bars, as well as platinum and palladium
in Gold IRA portfolios.

One very popular IRA gold investment is the
American Eagle Gold bullion coin. This particular coin was first introduced
to America in 1986 to compete with the Canadian Maple Leaf, another gold bullion coin that
is permissible in a gold 401K. The Austrian Philharmonic, American Buffalo,
and Australian Kangaroo gold coins are also permissible investments. Restricted IRA gold investments include the
Krugerrand, Mexican 50 Peso gold bullion coin, as well as rare coins such as the liberty
head, Saint Gaudens, Swiss Franc, and British Sovereign to name but a few. Having outperformed all other precious metals
investments in 2010, silver investing is more popular than ever. American Eagle Silver Bullion coins, the Australian
Kookaburra, Austrian Vienna Philharmonic, Canadian Maple Leaf, and Mexican Libertad
silver bullion coin are all permissible in a Self Directed IRA.

Silver bars and privately minted silver rounds
that are produced by manufacturers accredited by the NYSE or Comex are also permissible
investments. Finally we have platinum and Palladium. Permissible Platinum investments include the
American Eagle platinum coin, the Australian Koala, Canadian Maple Leaf, and Isle of Man
Noble platinum coin. Palladium investments include those bars and
coins that are produced by a national mint. The Self Directed IRA or Gold IRA is a powerful
tool for diversifying your investment portfolio and protecting your future. It can be setup with ease as long as your
current 401K meets certain requirements. To get your free gold investor kit click the
link below: https://www.regalassets.com/a/1237/ Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5661525 Gold Roth IRA gold roth ira account
gold roth ira investments gold roth ira
buy gold roth ira can buy gold roth ira
gold roth ira rules.

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Why Retirement Income is so Important

Canada is getting older in 1980 less than 2 A5 
million Canadians were over the age of 65 around   9% of the Canadian population recently that 
number was over 7.3 million almost 19% of the   population in 1980 the average 65-year-old could 
expect to reach 81 now the average 65-year-old can   expect to reach 86 and there are almost 50% more 
Canadians aged 100 or older than there was two   decades ago basically more Canadians are getting 
older and living longer which poses a significant   challenge for retirement funding traditional 
retirement savings have relied on withdrawing   from a fixed amount of capital with some cash 
flow from CPP OAS and fixed income Investments   like bonds and gic's however as Canadians live 
longer they may expect significant costs down   the road such as long-term care at the same 
time most of these fixed income Investments   are paying at rates below current inflation 
levels and what about running out of capital   some Canadians are faced with the difficult 
and complex choice of delaying retirement or   going back to work compromising the retirement 
lifestyle dreams or passing on the cost of care   to the Next Generation attractive and steady 
monthly income can help simplify things for   retirees Harvest Equity income and enhanced Equity 
income ETFs pay consistent monthly income at rates   above inflation they are RSP and riff eligible 
they hold portfolios of established companies   that remain exposed to market growth High income 
from Harvest Equity income ETFs can help retirees   offset their Rift payments supplement income 
and Live Well into retirement visit our website   for more information on harvest income ETFs for 
retirement Harvest income happens [Music] here

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7 Biggest Retirement Planning Mistakes People Regret

we all look forward to retirement it's the time to sit back relax and enjoy the fruits of our labor unfortunately whatever aspirations we may have for our golden years can quickly turn into a nightmare if we make certain mistakes when planning for this phase of life these mistakes are surprisingly common and tend to lead to financial stress and regret with a big impact on quality of life some of these mistakes are 1. not planning for retirement two retiring too soon three relying too heavily on Social Security 4. underestimating health care costs 5. failing to save enough for retirement six taking on too much debt seven not maintaining strong relationships if you want to learn more about these mistakes and how to avoid them subscribe to the channel a new video is coming soon and you won't want to miss it.

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Why Millennials Need to Rethink Retirement

so much has changed economically for Millennials and gen Z compared to their Gen X and Boomer predecessors should retirement planning still be approached in the same way or should the work in whatever capacity you can get for 30 years so you can save enough to never work again strategy be amended what if there's a better way [Music] for as long as Retirement has been a thing it's required a ridiculous amount of financial forethought Logistics and frankly hope it is the definition of the long game because it's almost impossible to put it off until the last minute but the retirement landscape has changed significantly over the last century and retirement as a concept is actually fairly new for most of human history people just worked until they died fun the origins of retirement are traced back to Otto von Bismarck in the 1800s when he suggested government-run financial support for older members of society Social Security was passed in America fewer than 100 years ago in 1935 and then corporations decided they would also help foot the bill and pension plans also known as defined benefit plans came into Vogue but 1978 legislation introduced a new way to save in section 401K of the tax code that quietly shifted the burden from the employee clear to the employee in this new legislation creating a defined contribution plan paved the way for the pensions which were expensive for employers to maintain to slowly fall out of favor especially as people began living longer so it's kind of no surprise that today's American workers are under saving since funding your own retirement now mostly without a pension is a relatively new hurdle the risk shift from institutions responsible for funding retirement to individuals being responsible for funding their retirements via 401ks and IRAs has placed the onus almost squarely on the shoulders of workers to figure this thing out buffered by the average social security check worth checks notes fifteen hundred fifty dollars per month that has big implications for young people today because it highlights something crucial retirement is an evolving concept almost necessarily it looks different for every gen generation so Millennials and gen Z have to play this long game differently than those who came before us not just in how we plan financially but also in how we structure Our Lives here's the good news though that means we are given the opportunity to Define for ourselves what type of life we want to build more broadly so knowing it's the long game how do you build a life you don't need a break from rather than bisecting your life into two halves your working half and your retired half like a budget production of the Apple TV plus hit Severance and going ham at each foreign mixing the two together can make the result even more enjoyable and fulfilling overall than saving all of your RNR for the back half of your life it makes sense to devote some time energy and effort to constructing a lifestyle for yourself that you are not itching to escape from every chance you get or counting down the years until retirement and probably making a lot of sacrifices in order to speed up that process in fact that may mean more midday breaks to watch TV or take bike rides or nap on a Wednesday afternoon the paradoxes if you can build a life you don't need a break from then planning for retirement will unfold more organically and take the pressure off but here's the rub it might take a little bit of effort and time to get to a place where your life your routines your workflows your savings cushion can be molded into a form that fits your ideal schedule you may have young children right now who dictate your day you may work in a time-sucking job you may be too low on the corporate food chain to call these types of shots for yourself especially if your work is location dependent or closely tied to another person's schedule you may be juggling all three of these things simultaneously but it's helpful and productive even to dream about what an ideal week in the life would look like it's about creating routines and working styles that generate the most positive outcomes for you it might not be worthwhile to grind it out in a job you hate for 30 years solely for the money before you allow yourself to explore something you're actually interested in that may not pay as well an ideal second act may be less about having unlimited free time to lounge around and more about having meaningful activities to fill your time and for most people that will include work and hobbies you find invigorating so here are a few prompts that I like to ask to help conceptualize what this would look like for you number one in what ways do I deplete myself or run myself into the ground number two what does a life of meaning mean to me number three if I were only allowed to work for two hours per week what parts of my job would I want to keep and what would I want to ditch I'm using an absurdly low amount of time just to force Focus here so only the best stuff can stay number four which rituals or practices make me feel most like myself and what's stopping me right now from doing more of them so now that we've got some of our conceptual boxes checked let's switch gears a little bit and talk about the financial side of this picture calculating your retirement needs based on your age we can leverage some hashtag math to understand how much we need to save whether your retirement income is going to support a traditional retirement at traditional retirement age 65 Plus or it's going to be your supplemental income starting in your 40s if you begin working part-time on a passion project the generally agreed upon replacement rate for income in retirement is about 75 percent in the financial planning world and replacement rate basically just means in order for you to replace your income how much does your portfolio need to be able to pay you this advice is given under the assumption that you'll pay less in taxes as a retiree you'll stop saving and you'll benefit from other Cost Cuts but the problem in my mind is that almost nobody makes the same amount of money throughout their entire career and wild swings and income can make identifying one pre-retirement income pretty difficult here's why this matters though 56 percent of people say that they expect to have less than five hundred thousand dollars by the time they retire providing an annual income of twenty thousand dollars per year according to the four percent rule so supplement that with the average social security check and that's about thirty two hundred dollars per month to live on depending on your needs and your timing that might be enough but it might not be as the same study found that only three percent of retirees deemed they were living the dream while around 37 percent said they were comfortable but I want all of Rich Girl Nation to live dream so let's unpack the math that can show us how to get there first we need to identify our general goal bearing in mind that this is a ballpark and to State the obvious the earlier you start the easier this will be there's really no getting around that so what Grand number in the bank should we shoot for I recommend using your monthly spending plus buffer as a guidepost for how much to invest as opposed to the aforementioned 75 income replacement rate the challenging part about focusing on your monthly spending is that it too fluctuates through different life stages and it'll be impacted by factors like where you live and how many dependents you have and your medical needs but a monthly spending range is usually useful enough to provide a ballpark for example I know that when I was single I lived on about three thousand dollars per month then when I got married my half of our monthly spending jumped up to about four thousand dollars per month when we have kids it might go up to six thousand dollars for my half for consistency's sake so this means our dual income needs to to range anywhere from six to twelve thousand dollars per month and if I can multiply by twelve I can get our annual spending somewhere between 72k and 144k per year depending on the stage of life in today's dollars and If I multiply those numbers by 25 I get our portfolio targets that'll allow for a safe withdrawal rate of roughly four percent that means my ballpark goal is anywhere between 1.8 and 3.6 million dollars so I can take the upper bound to the 3.6 and know that it would likely suffice as my sole source of income in retirement if my ideal life involved no work at all or work of some kind that wasn't paid like caring for family this would be the number necessary for a traditional retirement I can take the lower bound of 1.8 million and know that it would likely suffice as a less traditional retirement buffer for my costs providing the majority of my monthly expenses if enjoyable part-time work could provide the rest this would be the number more appropriate it for the evolved retirement blended with your working life model that we're discussing today unless you think but Katie I do not dream of Labor of any kind why would you suggest that we sandbag the OG retirement Vision with something as silly as part-time work consider this in a recent study from American advisors group they found roughly half of the 1500 people aged 60 to 75 surveyed said they plan to work part-time in retirement 12 percent said they never planned to stop working which is actually an increase from six percent in 2019.

So this is already reality for many retirees but it's hard to say whether it's by choice or out of necessity but work sure feels different when you are choosing it which makes saving and investing for the future a good idea no matter what your plans are and by making intentional shifts toward fulfilling work earlier you are less likely to hit traditional retirement age and feel disappointed if you slogged it out for 30 years doing something you didn't even like and still don't have enough to live a comfortable retirement and with regards to those example ranges the good news is that this is all proportional for example if you spend four thousand per month your gold number would be around 1.2 million which is still a lot but surprisingly achievable with consistent effort and compounding so let's figure out how close you already are to your long-term goal the concept of compounding can help us understand how close we already are to reaching our goal amount and for the sake of Simplicity we'll use a lower average rate of return that takes inflation into account for example maybe you're 30 years old today you've got 100K invested by the time you're 50 that 100K will be worth three hundred twenty thousand dollars assuming a six percent real rate of return even if you didn't invest anything else to reiterate I like to use six percent as a post-inflation rate of return because it helps accurately represent what the money will actually be worth in today's terms simply plug your existing invested assets into a compound interest calculator we'll link a good one in the description use a six percent rate of return and then plug in a realistic number of years between now and when you expect to make this type of transition if you want to be more conservative so think higher inflation lower nominal returns you can use five or even four percent you'll see that depending on how much you have already you may be closer than you think some of you may realize you are already in a position where you can safely downshift and make life adjustments without meaningfully threatening your future security to put a finer point on this you may already have enough saved and invested for future use needs that any stress you're currently experiencing about sticking around in a highly paid field that just is not right for you might be unfounded because we don't know what the individually funded and personally responsible retirement is going to look like for a generation it's worth interrogating whether or not the traditional model for retirement still makes sense for us instead you can determine what a life you don't need a break from looks like and set your financial goals accordingly with a range based on your spending depending on your age and how much you already have saved and invested you may be way closer to safety than you think and if you want to hear the full episode of this week's money with Katie show click the video that just popped up on the screen and in the description of this video our show is a production of morning brew and is produced by henna Velez and me Katie Gotti tossan Devin Emery is our chief content officer our video editors are Christy Muldoon Sebastian Vega and Nicole Friedman additional fact checking comes from Kate Brandt foreign [Music]

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Top Tips for How to Live a Long, Happy Life in Retirement

time and again we hear about the dangers of smoking unhealthy eating and drinking too much alcohol we know these are unhealthy habits and they put us closer to the Grave that's why if we want to live longer and you want to live longer and happier we need to understand that we need to possibly make some changes to our lifestyle so our question for you today is do you want to start changing your lifestyle in order to live longer if you've said yes keep watching we all know people who lived a hard life they either had a rough time at the end or they died before their time and my dad was one of those guys who died before his time he had a great career he was a wonderful role model and he was a fantastic business leader he was also a marine and that gave him that dose of feeling indestructible but he aged really fast once he retired he ate poorly drank way too much and he quit moving his body you know he died at 80 and I believe had he done what we're going to talk to you about today I believe there's a good chance he'd still be alive which would be nice today we're going to walk you through some tried and true healthy lifestyle habits and behaviors and if you apply these right now as you get closer to achieving your healthier happier life you may live longer what's the first one what do we want to talk about first the first one I feel like we talk about a lot but you can't hear this enough we all love eating but eating a balanced diet is critical to a healthy lifestyle the question right now is what type of food are you eating are you eating junk food or are you eating healthy food you asking me are you asking I'm asking you uh well then I'm just going to say that I eat mostly healthy food definitely go up the rails once in a while I would agree but our body needs a wide range of nutrients in the right amounts so that we can grow develop and it can maintain itself it's you know we have to give it nutrition in order for our body to behave the way we want it to behave but balance is the key right because basically too much or not enough of any nutrient can lead to problems the bottom line is if you're currently living on pizza or even just pure meat every day then it's time to mix some greens into your diet you know our nutritionist or no not a nutritionist our naturopath doctor um Dana Dana tells me that I need to eat seven cups of vegetables a day and when she first told me that I said there's no way but really it really isn't that much and it's just a behavioral change so we have three cups of vegetables with dinner three with lunch and maybe I'm missing one cup we might be probably missing one or two If we're honest for sure they do say that you should get 95 of your food from Plants there are places around the world where people eat like that and they do live longer so basically the real challenge today is for you to you know just push yourself to eat less meat and some more vegetables or at least bring more vegetables and plant products into your diet you know my mom used to say look at your plate and if your plate is a one color palette plate you're in trouble need to add as much color to your plate as you possibly can and you know that sounds really hard and and and it is it is but if you try this when you go shopping only shop the outside perimeter of your grocery store it's where all the Natural Foods tend to be and avoid the aisles see if you can get everything you need just from the perimeter yeah on the perimeter there's your your fresh beef Fish and Chicken your protein all the vegetables are there and we definitely suggest you look for organic it's a little more money but it's better for you and it can be healthy and just take baby steps here but if you pick up a can of food that you want to put into your mouth or a bag of food and you can't pronounce any of the ingredients you shouldn't be eating it because it's chemicals it's just not good for you easier said than done it is but baby steps for sure right another lifestyle change would be this as easy as this two words don't smoke full stop really just don't smoke because smoking is strongly linked to the rise of some diseases and even early death you know my mom smoked three packs of cigarettes a day from the age of 14.

to when she died at the age of not 80 because she went into the home but until 75 years old so 60 whatever 60 plus years three packs a day but she got dementia and in in my mind you know smoking can lead to diseases like that according to Healthline we found this note that men and women who smoke may lose up to 10 years of their lives and be three times more likely to die prematurely than those that never picked up a cigarette but you know what don't be too alarmed there is still time to quit and a chance for you to prolong your life that same Healthline report said quitting smoking in your 60s may add up to 3.7 years on your life in fact you can even still quit in your 80s and provide some health benefits so the long and short of this section is don't smoke or quit smoking yeah so no matter how old you are if you quit smoking now it'll be good for you now the other the other lifestyle change that's really important is to do brain training and you're like what is that well not only do we need to exercise our physical bodies what we need to exercise our brain as well you know I do Wordle every day some crossword puzzles I've tried Sudoku I'm just not very good at it but keeping your mind physically fit can save us from certain conditions that will shorten your lifespan even link to Alzheimer's disease like my mama yep here's a few fun ways that you can exercise your mind I feel like we did this when Luca was here our grandson oh my God we played hours and hours ago goldfish from 5 30 in the morning till 7.

How about learning a new word every day when I read my Kindle or I read my iPad in the morning and there's a word that I don't understand you can just hold it down and look up the definition and I really tried to do that on a regular basis I mean I Journal which you do which is great it's my brain you know you can memorize some lists I'm not good at that at the grocery store by the way so if I don't have it written down it's not coming home but memorize some other lists and sometimes you can just do some quick ad subtraction multiplication in your head instead of picking up your calculator you remember the back of the composition book they were black and white and it's great school on the back was the multiplication table yeah one through twelve I had that memorized 12 times 12 is 144.

Good for you that's awesome isn't that good here's another thing to help your lifestyle change go for a jog even a walk it's amazing what this can do for you you don't need to do it for long 20 minutes a day will do it science states that walking 20 minutes a day briskly can add five years to your life why wouldn't you do it you know it's funny I bet on all of our videos we probably have said this out of the 200 videos 10 times at least this is such an easy thing to do and there's a win just get out and move we take breaks throughout the day down here in Florida we'll jump on our bike for 10 minutes that's it five minutes out five minutes back it just gives you a burst of energy absolutely absolutely so the other thing you want to do is you've got to find a way to prioritize your happiness being happy is probably one of the best healthy lifestyle habits you can follow for the rest of your life now when we get up in the morning we have a choice how do we want to feel how do we want to approach the day do I want to give Jody a kiss and say hey honey how are you it's great to see you I'm so excited that we're here together for the day or God I'm so annoyed and I'm so sad and I'm so this that's all mindset so prioritize your happiness and just remember happier individuals have a 3.7 percent reduction in death over a five-year period we've read a bunch of studies about being happy and prioritizing what makes you happy will have positive effects on your mood and your ability to live longer you know um you have been if you have been following us you know I'm a big fan of quick and easy journaling in the morning every morning I get up besides giving Jody a kiss and saying hey it's good to see you tonight I always write three gratitudes three things I'm grateful for and one self-affirmation one um self-affirmation I am a good speaker I am a good husband I am a good father those three gratitudes in one self affirmation always get me in a good mood that's great that's great that's an easy tip for people to use another important lifestyle change is and I love this one I might love it a little too much not gonna lie but get some sun not too much but some sun I mean I love the sun I get energy from it my mood is improved and you know vitamin D the sunshine vitamin has been shown to fight disease improve bone health and ward off depression you know what I'm going to say now I know okay not too much so right I get out in the sun I have 70 all over my body I have a hat long sleeve shirt long sleeve pants I'm on the beach in a chair under the umbrella with all that stuff on I look like an idiot but that's you know I get enough reflection off the water and I do love we take breaks during the day we'll sit on the front porch and get a little bit of sun it is important to get some sun during the day you just have to be careful right you know how much sun you know 15 to 30 minutes a day with the adequate protection should give you the right amount of vitamin D from your sunshine I like sun early in the morning right between 12 and 3 30 or four I'm out yeah I'm in the shade another lifestyle change would be to stay hydrated this is something else we talk about quite a bit staying hydrated is easy to do and it's an important healthy lifestyle habit that you need to remember to live longer adequate hydration is essential for promoting Optimal Health and you know this because we talk about it a lot and you read about it a lot and your friends tell you about it half your body weight in ounces I need six to seven 12 ounce glasses of water a day to meet the minimum requirements so just do it another one is to laugh often you know you've heard the old saying laughter is the best medicine well it's the plain truth laughing is so powerful do you ever notice when you laugh your heavy burdens tend to get lighter yeah do we laugh enough no we should laughter is a powerful antidote for stress anxiety pain and conflict we need to laugh we do say something funny why'd the chicken cross the egg no what the road so I'm a terrible joke teller so what we need to do you know what we're going to do tonight what we're gonna watch a TV show that's gonna make us laugh we're gonna watch an old funny movie how about that that sounds good you know the other thing is to maintain and strengthen relationships according to a Harvard health article social connections and relationships are very important to a happier life we are social animals and Studies have shown that it's critical to have these in our life yeah there have been dozens of studies showing that people who have satisfying relationships with their family their friends and their Community are happier and have fewer health problems and they often live longer now here's another tip that we talk about we got a lot of tips in this one get enough sleep people tend to neglect the importance of sleep they focus their energy and I'm gonna have a great day they do all these kind of things and finally go to sleep and wake up tired and grumpy it's not it's not good to do that you know you have to treat sleep as something that's sacred and you can't sacrifice it it is sometimes the thing to sacrifice right I'll get up early and do that I'll go to bed late and finish that we actually do that with work too lack of sleep can also often lead to serious health problems so Sleep Quality not just the amount of time in bed is important to your lifespan I think that you'd all agree that you'd like to live as long as you can and on top of that live a healthier life well into your 90s or more there's no crystal ball to see into the future but your vision includes being healthy I'm sure so make the decision to make some changes now this video is helpful you're gonna love this next one finding your path to physical wellness we're going to help you find a baseline where you are today how to build a vision and then bring in healthy habits and routines to support that Vision so watch this one next

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How do I rollover my IRA to gold or silver?

foreign how do I roll over my IRA to gold or silver navigating the process of rolling over your IRA into gold or silver can help protect and diversify your retirement portfolio first choose a reputable gold or silver Ira custodian and open a self-directed IRA account with them coordinate with your current Ira custodian and the new custodian to transfer funds from your existing Ira to the new self-directed Ira once the funds are transferred work with your new custodian to select the appropriate gold or silver asset to purchase within the self-directed IRA in conclusion rolling over your IRA to gold or silver involves choosing a reputable custodian transferring funds and selecting the right precious metals assets to diversify your retirement portfolio if you're interested in rolling over your 401k into a gold Ira gold and silver trust can help call us today to discuss your specific retirement needs and download your free gold and silver investor guide this guide provides valuable information on adding precious metals to your Diversified portfolio foreign

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