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How To Save For Retirement: Suze Orman Shares Her Best Money Advice | TODAY

>>> > > > AS WELL AS WE'RE BACK WITH OUR >>> > > > AND ALSO WE'RE BACK WITH OUR SPECIAL SERIES LIVING LONGER SPECIAL COLLECTION LIVING LONGER TODAY, EXPLORING WAYS TO LIVER TODAY, EXPLORING WAYS TO LIVER NOT ONLY LONGER BUT BETTER. > > PUPIL LENDING FINANCIAL OBLIGATION IS THE MOST >> > > STUDENT LOAN FINANCIAL DEBT IS THE THE MAJORITY OF DANGEROUS FINANCIAL OBLIGATION YOU TIN HAVE BAR DANGEROUS FINANCIAL DEBT YOU CAN HAVE BAR NONE SINCE IN 90% OF THE NONE DUE TO THE FACT THAT IN 90% OF THE CASES, 99%, IT IS NOT CASES, 99%, IT IS NOT DISCHARGEABLE IN BANKRUPTCY.DISCHARGEABLE IN BANKRUPTCY. > > YOU'RE TALKING CONCERNING HAVING A >> > > YOU'RE CHATTING REGARDING HAVING A SURPLUS OF 200 DOLLAR WHEN IS EXCESS OF 200 DOLLAR WHEN IS YOU'RE 30.

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I Retired Rich At Age 27…And This Is How I Did It

Today I want to share with you exactly how I retire at the age of 27 how I did it and maybe how you could do it as well you see I started very early at a young age the path of entrepreneurship I started my first business when I was in high school just with a couple of buddies mowing lawns for people in our neighborhoods that's my very first business there are three things that I did during this time that allows me to retire young and with higher rich so the very first thing is this I focus on developing what I call high income skills my high income skills skills that allow me to bring value to the marketplace in exchange of money now I define high income skills as skills that could make me $10,000 or more per month you see the first five years of my business career when I was getting started the first five years I didn't take a single day off I was working 12 to 14 hours a day seven days a week for the first five years while all my friends they were out there drinking drinking and having parties and chasing girls I was fucking working I sacrifice I made a lot of sacrifices I believe if you don't sacrifice for your dream then your dream becomes your sacrifice so I made a decision I pay the price early on I spent a few years of my life working on myself working on my business doing the things that most people are too lazy to do not willing to do so I could have what most people cannot have the very first high income skill that I develop was copywriting now you might wonder what that is well it's simply the skill to use words to sell that's it Prine persuasion or persuasion in print and our words running a one-man advertising agency myself if you watch the TV show man man that's kind of what I was doing without all the smoking and all that bullshit but I was basically a cocking gun in my early 20s working with companies working with entrepreneurs and I was making 10,000 a month $12,000 a month in my early 20s and at the time I thought he was it was like I felt like a million bucks I thought it was the most money I've ever seen and I did that then later on I took that money the income did I earn I put that aside and I started coin called a scalable business now if you want to retire early and retire young one of the most important things that you have to know is noticing identifying trends at a time I went onto the internet I saw this trend on the Internet we're talking about back then remember Netscape dial-up modem I'm talking about overture for pay-per-click you know good old days you're watching this young young guys you may or may not even know this but I'm talking about Yahoo for search engines okay Facebook and then later on Google but I'm talking about that so when I got started back then early and I noticed a trend on internet and I was importing collectibles from Hong Kong Bruce Lee collectibles actually and I was flipping them on eBay I was doing affiliate marketing I was doing digital marketing online I was selling digital products before PDF before all these things were even popular software all these things and that's how my first bucket of money then I took that money and I saw some of those physicists I cash out and I took that money and invest in real estate then my investments are able to support my lifestyle and that's how I retire at the age of 27 but here's one thing I've learned through that experience at the age of 27 I thought this was my dream I thought I want to get to a point where I don't have to work anymore I'll sit in a beach all day and that is going to be it and I did that the first month first 30 days I was sitting on a beach on English pay just to be there every single day right looking at a beach looking at the ocean I thought I have made it you know what all I got was sunburn that's it you may dream I'm sitting on a beach every day I'm telling you when you could do it I was bored out of my mind I thought this is fucking stupid I work so hard to get here and now I'm sitting on beach doing nothing this is dumb like did I work all like this heart and may all that sacrifices for this like come on because you've got to understand when you're entrepreneur I was going like this every day go go go go go suddenly when you have nothing to do when you cash out when you have investments you're like okay I guess what else do you do right after 30 days of that I was sick and tired of it I'm like this is a dumbest thing ever so the second month I did something different actually thought you know what I'm gonna I'm gonna watch the movies so at a time I rendered a lot of movies a lot I was watching six seven movies the DVDs stack of them every single day let me tell you something I love movies don't get me wrong but when you're watching six seven movies every fucking day you don't like movies so much anymore believe me okay after 30 days of that I'm like this is again the dumbest thing ever i I just felt like I so lazy I felt like I wasn't doing anything with my life then I went to talk to my mentor and he said okay Dan he's what I want you to do I want you to start in other business I said no no I'm not gonna start another business I was killing myself all these years so I could retire you don't understand I'm not gonna work he said no you're gonna start outta business I said no I am NOT gonna start down to business he said you're gonna start another business I said no but this time he said you're gonna start a business from a totally different place because now you're made it you could start your business coming from a place of strength coming from a place of abundance coming from a place of something that you want what do you want to create build it around your wor strength build it around your passion because now money's not an issue you're not just doing to make money what could you do how could you use all the skills that you've accumulated you've developed all the business acumen all the knowledge that you have how can you use that to do something great and I thought that I could do so that's my story that's how I retire at the age of 27 I don't know where you're at in your journey maybe you want to retire young maybe you want to retire at age of 45 55 65 I don't know where you're at but what I do know is it's possible and what I also do know is once you get there there's always an other step there's always an other level so don't wait don't feel like you have to get to a point where hey you know what I'm gonna spend my whole life doing stuff that I hate so I could get to a point where finally I could do some stuff that I love No enjoy the journey success is a journey not a destination

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How to Become Rich | Retire on $10 a day

Is it possible in this day and age to become a millionaire? Or perhaps the better question is why would you want to become a millionaire? I mean in media today Millionaires and billionaires for that matter are often not depicted in the best light. Characters like Scrooge McDuck or the always supremely evil C. Montgomery Burns come to mind here. And of course right now in real life we have the ever-present Donald Trump as one of the main poster boys of the super wealthy. So I suppose with that kind of media influence hovering over us our entire lives it's not surprising that most of us have a fairly negative view of the super wealthy and many really do not want to become a part of it. Especially since the majority of us don't personally know anyone who's Super Rich so we don't have anything to really balance the scales, and that's all we can really draw upon is what we see in the media.

And that's really unfortunate because there's a lot of really great wealthy people out there. But most of them are not in the public eye and even the ones that are in the public eye like Bill Gates don't get as much media attention as someone like donald Trump does. And as a result there are a lot of misconceptions about millionaires and the wealthy in general. Hey guys, Daniel here from Next Level Life and it recently occurred to me that I’ve been neglecting a huge part of what it takes to have that next level life that we all dream of… because whatever your dream life is, you need to have the finance resources in place first to be able to live it.

So with that in mind I’m going to be starting this new series on my channel covering various topics in the field of personal finance. And as you can see by the title for my first video of the series I wanted to talk about a simple plan that, if stuck to, will practically guarantee your future millionaire status as well as take a moment and really define what a millionaire is and is not. Because believe it or not even for the average American it is possible. No you know what possible is too soft of a claim because it's more than possible. In fact if you follow a few simple steps it's almost guaranteed. Don't believe me? Well hopefully over the course of this video as well as the rest of my personal finance videos that will be coming out soon I'll be able to convince you. So without further ado, let's get started. What is a millionaire? A millionaire is simply someone who has a million-dollar positive net worth. Meaning after subtracting debts and other liabilities and expenses they have a million dollars worth of stuff leftover between their cash their house and all their other assets.

That's really all there is to it. It has nothing to do with how much money you make. It has nothing to do with what type of person you are or how well-known you maybe, it simply means that your assets are valued at least 1 million dollars greater than your liabilities. But how can the average American get to that $1000000 positive net worth in their lifetime? I mean $1000000 that's 6 zeros, i'd imagine that most of us have never written a check with more than three zeros. Unless of course you bought a new car or house with cash and if that's the case kudos to you, you may not even need this video because you're already probably well on your way to that million-dollar net worth. Now I said that if you follow a few simple steps it's not only possible to reach that million-dollar marker, it's almost guaranteed.

Let's find out how. Well I did a few calculations and found out that over the course of the last 40 years the S&P 500 has returned an average of percent per year not including dividends. Now technically speaking past results are no indicator of future returns, but until we see the future returns this is the best we've got to go off of. So assuming that over the next 40 years the market does roughly the same as it did since 1978 you could invest $2per month over the next 40 years and become a millionaire. Again assuming no dividends. Now 261 dollars may seem like a lot but when you break it down it's not even $10 a day, and there are lots of ways to save money. You can cut cable, or go down to a lower internet speed, or not eat out quite as often, or use coupons when you're shopping for groceries, or you can do none of those things and instead find a way to make a little bit of extra income.

Maybe you start mowing lawns or shovel and driveways on the side, maybe you start selling old clothes that you don't need anymore online, or if you're young you might be able to start teaching people how to use social media better. You'd honestly be amazed at how many people would pay you to do that. There's a ton of options out there, all you have to do is pick the one or maybe few that work out the best for you and start your own Journey on the path to becoming financially independent. Now there's a couple of things that I want to clear up before ending the video for those of you who are a little bit more Analytical in nature. That percent is the geometric mean rate of return that the S&P 500 has had since 1978 according to Yahoo finance. All I did to get it was go through each year and look at where the market was in September because as of the recording of this video September just ended.

Then I put them all into the Excel spreadsheet and calculated the return. And I think the reason why we hear so many different rate of returns thrown around by Financial gurus is because of the inflation effect. I've heard gurus say that you can expect to earn anywhere from 6 to 10% per year in the market. And depending on what time frame and type of average you use any of those numbers could be true. For example if you go from 1978 and use an arithmetic average the average return on the market would be about percent per year. Inflation is generally assumed to be about three to four percent so if you adjust for inflation your realized return would be somewhere in that 6 – 7% range. If you don't adjust for inflation of course you're at nearly a 10 percent return. So there you go there's a simple formula to retiring with the amount of wealth that most of us would consider to be rich.

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Can YOU Afford to Retire? | 4% Rule Explained | Safe Withdrawal Rate

How much money do you think you would need to be able to retire? It's a question that a lot of people have asked their financial advisers and it's one that seems to have a different answer for just about every time it's asked. And the reason for that is simple the amount of money that you need to be able to retire depends entirely on how much money you think you can earn in retirement through interest and dividends and maybe even a part-time job if that's your thing, and perhaps even more importantly how much money you're actually going to need to survive in retirement. And that number seems to change each and every time you ask as well because projections of things like medical expenses change as time goes on. And I'm sure those of you who are nearing retirement watching this video know medical expenses just seem to be going through the roof, particularly for retirees. But that doesn't really help us it doesn't give us a goal to strive for as we're going through our working careers. We may not be able to come up with an exact number that we'll need but can we come up with something that's at least going to be close? Well today I'm going to talk about something called the 4% rule and how it gives us that goal to shoot for.

I'm also going to be talking about some other factors to keep in mind when you're using this rule of thumb as well as some situations where you're going to want to avoid the 4% rule in entirely. Let's get started. So what is the 4% rule? It's a rule of thumb that's used to determine the amount of funds that you will withdraw from a retirement account each year. It's also sometimes called the safe withdrawal rate because the money you take out usually consists mostly of interest and dividends, and thus your principal either stays the same or goes down a little bit but not too much. In fact in 1994 a financial advisor named William Bengan did an exhaustive study of historical returns in the market focusing heavily on the severe Market crashes of the great Depression and the early 1970s and concluded that even during those hard Times no historical case existed where the safe withdrawal rate exhausted a retirement portfolio in less than 33 years.

And for most of us 33 years would easily cover our retirement. The idea behind the rule is that once you have approximately 25 times your annual expenses saved for retirement you should be able to retire with reasonable certainty that you could survive until death on your savings. Because at that point the amount that you take out for your annual expenses would be approximately 4% of your retirement savings. And when I say 4% of your retirement savings I mean your entire retirement savings anything that's been earmarked to use only in retirement this includes 401ks IRAs and any other ways you've saved a nest egg for retirement.

For example if you had $450,000 in your 401k and $50,000 personal IRA then you would have $500,000 in all of your retirement accounts and your initial withdrawal on the first year retirement would be 4% of that $500,000 or $20,000. So some other factors that you're going to want to keep in mind when using the 4% rule in addition to keeping an eye on your expenses, is to account for inflation. The 4% rule believe it or not actually allows you to increase the amount you withdraw to keep Pace with inflation. You can account for this either by just setting a flat 2% increase to your withdrawals each year which is the target inflation rate by the Federal Reserve or by just looking to see what the inflation rate was for the current year and adjusting based off of that. Now you might be wondering how this could possibly be I mean if you increase how much you would withdraw to keep up with inflation won't you eventually run out of money? It's a legitimate question but as it turns out no.

And it's because over the long term the market goes up. Now there are a lot of numbers that are thrown around by financial advisors about how much the market actually goes up I've heard anything from 6 to 10% a year on average. I'm going to be conservative here and go with the 6% end of the scale. So let's go back to the example I've been using in the video you start off retirement with $500,000 in savings, and in the first year of retirement you withdraw $20,000 or 4% of your savings. And I'm also using a compound interest calculator here, and it assumes that whatever you withdraw is withdrawn right at the start of the year.

So the $20,000 is going to be withdrawn on January 1st of every year. I'm only noting that because it makes it a worst case scenario you were to say withdraw $20,000 over the course of an entire year but you did it in installments of $1,600 each month you would be able to earn interest on the rest of the money that you hadn't yet withdrawn throughout the rest of the year and thus you're ending net worth would end up being a little bit higher than it will be in this example. So on January 1st you withdraw $20,000, meaning you only have $480,000 left in your nest egg. But over the course of the year the market goes up by 6% which means the value of your portfolio at December 31st would be $508,800. Now in year two of retirement you increase your withdrawal by 2%. So on January 1st of the second year of your retirement you withdraw $20,400. That brings your portfolio value down from $508,800 to $488,400. But again the market goes up 6%, which by December 31st brings the total value of your portfolio up to $517,704. If you were to continue to calculate this out for 30 years you're ending net worth would be $787,716.90, almost $300,000 dollars more than what you started with in retirement! But of course this is just a rule of thumb so there are situations where you're going to want to avoid using this all together.

One of those situations would be if your portfolio consists of a lot more higher risk Investments then say your typical index funds and bonds that are usually in a retirement portfolio. This is because obviously a higher risk investment can go down a lot faster than your typical retirement portfolios, which can be extremely devastating especially early on in retirement. Also this rule of thumb only really works if you stick to it year in and year out. And if you're not going to be able to do that then you don't want to use this as your retirement goal, because even violating the rule for one year to splurge on a major purchase can have a severe effect on your retirement savings down the road because the principal from which the interest and dividends that you get to survive is compounded from gets reduced. Let me give you an example of how this works: Say that in addition to taking out the $20,000 your first year in retirement, you decide to treat yourself with a new car and figuring that you'll be traveling a lot during retirement you want to get one that's good, big, and comfortable as well as reliable.

So for this example let's say you get a new Toyota 4Runner for about $35,000. Now I know that you could probably find it for cheaper used, but not everybody likes to buy cars used I know my dad didn't and besides this is just an example. So you drop $35,000 on a new car and you still have to have money to live so the $20,000 still does come out of your retirement, meaning that you only have $445,000 leftover. Now admittedly the market still does go up about 6% leaving you with a nest egg of $471,700 at the end of the year.

And even if you were to stick to the 4% withdrawal rate for the rest of retirement which, would be 30 years in this example, by the 27th year you would be taking out more than you earned an interest and dividends as well as how much the market went up. And by the 30th year of retirement you would withdraw $35,516, but with interest, dividends, and Market appreciation your portfolio would have only gained $33,209 in value.

And that could put you in a pretty dangerous position should the market go down for a couple years, or if you have some kind of medical emergency. Now I don't want to make it seem all bad, I mean unless you retired early, after 30 years in retirement you're probably in your 90s and don't need the money to last very much longer and even in this example you still do end with $586,000. It could be worse right? However I do want to bring your attention to the difference that this made. This one purchase made your ending net worth that you could have left as inheritance to your children or grandchildren or even donated to charity go from $787,000 all the way down to $586,000, that's a difference of over $200,000. And all that's with just one splurge. But that'll about do it for me I hope you enjoyed the video and if you did or if you learned something be sure to like And subscribe I've got a lot more of these Finance coming out in the near future as well as some more book summaries and other fun stuff.

But with that being said, thanks for watching and have a great day. .

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